Thomas Paine : Collected Writings : Common Sense / The Crisis / Rights of Man / The Age of Reason

Thomas Paine : Collected Writings : Common Sense / The Crisis / Rights of Man / The Age of Reason

Thomas Paine

Language: English

Pages: 626

ISBN: 1442146966

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Thomas Paine's Collected Writings which include Common Sense, The Rights of Man, The American Crisis, and The Age of Reason written by legendary author Thomas Paine is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great classic will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, Thomas Paine's Collected Writings which include Common Sense, The Rights of Man, The American Crisis, and The Age of Reason is required reading for various courses and curriculums. And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Thomas Paine is highly recommended. Published by Classic House Books and beautifully produced, Thomas Paine's Collected Writings which include Common Sense, The Rights of Man, The American Crisis, and The Age of Reason would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.

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would have any thing to do in private affairs. And here the conference ended. In the latter end of the year 1780, col. George Morgan and other gentlemen came again to me and endeavoured to make me understand, that whatever might be the event of the company’s affairs, they were in possession of certain papers, which might be rendered exceedingly useful to the public, and proposed leaving them in my hands for perusal, which they did. Here I got the very materials I had long wished for. The

tumultuous misconduct with which the internal affairs of the present revolution is conducted. All that now can be hoped for is limited to France only, and I agree with your motion of not interfering in the government of any foreign country, nor permitting any foreign country to interfere in the government of France. This decree was necessary as a preliminary toward terminating the war. But while these internal contentions continue, while the hope remains to the enemy of seeing the republic fall

instrument of music then in fashion. Were we now to speak of prophesying with a fiddle, or with a pipe and tabor, the expression would have no meaning, or would appear ridiculous, and to some people contemptuous, because we have changed the meaning of the word. We are told of Saul being among the prophets, and also that he prophesied; but we are not told what they prophesied, nor what he prophesied. The case is, there was nothing to tell; for these prophets were a company of musicians and poets;

sense of pain is the first symptom of recovery in profound stupefactions. His condition is deplorable. He is obliged to submit to all the insults of France and Spain without daring to know or resent them, and thankful for the most trivial evasions to the most humble remonstrances. The time was when he could not deign an answer to a petition from America, and the time now is when he dare not give an answer to an affront from France. The capture of Burgoyne’s army will sink his consequence as much

wantoned in the prospect of enjoying the fruits of our laborious industry. Every thing, therefore, which looked like conciliation was treated as a concession flowing from feebleness of soul. The spirit of despotism, flushed with hope and inured to guilt, turned a hard, unfeeling eye upon the miseries of human nature, and directed, well pleased, the storm of vengeance on the head of freedom. But that full tide of success which had carried their expectations so high, began to ebb away: The gallant

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