United States History: 1789 to 1841: The Developing Nation (Essentials)

United States History: 1789 to 1841: The Developing Nation (Essentials)

John F. Chilton

Language: English

Pages: 55

ISBN: 2:00262689

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Overview

EA’s Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals.

United States History: 1789 to 1841 includes Washington and the Federalist Era, the Jeffersonian Era, the War of 1812, the Monroe presidency, the Marshall court, the Missouri Compromise, Jacksonian Democracy, Ante-Bellum culture, Manifest Destiny, and increasing sectional stress.

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more food more cheaply for the urban workers. As in industry, specialization and mechanization became the rule in agriculture, particularly on the newly opening western prairies of Illinois, Iowa and Kansas. 6.5.1 Inventions and Technology Large-scale farming on the prairies spurred critical inventions. McCormick’s mechanical reaper, patented in 1834, enabled a crew of six men to harvest in one day as much wheat as 15 men could using older methods. John Deere’s steel plow, patented in 1837,

which was nurtured, as reflected in such oral literature as the “Brer Rabbit” tales. Violent reaction to repression was not uncommon. Gabriel Prosser in Richmond (1800), Denmark Vesey in Charleston (1822), and Nat Turner in coastal Virginia (1831) all plotted or led uprisings of blacks against their white masters. Rumors of such uprisings kept whites in a state of constant apprehension. The ultimate rebellion was to simply leave, and many tried to run away, some successfully. Especially from

of national unity. 3.1.1 Post-War Boom The years following the war were characterized by a high foreign demand for American cotton, grain and tobacco; commerce flourished. The 2nd National Bank, through its overly-liberal credit policies, proved to be an inflationary influence, and the price level rose rapidly. 3.1.2 The Depression of 1819 Inventories of British manufactured goods had built up during the war, and English merchants began to dump their products on the American market at

Author CHAPTER 1 - THE FEDERALIST ERA CHAPTER 2 - THE JEFFERSONIAN ERA CHAPTER 3 - INTERNAL DEVELOPMENT, 1820 – 1830 CHAPTER 4 - THE JACKSONIAN DEMOCRACY, 1829-1841 CHAPTER 5 - ANTE-BELLUM CULTURE: AN AGE OF REFORM CHAPTER 6 - DIVERGING SOCIETIES — LIFE IN THE NORTH CHAPTER 7 - DIVERGING SOCIETIES — LIFE IN THE SOUTH CHAPTER 8 - MANIFEST DESTINY AND WESTWARD EXPANSION These “Little Books” have rescued lots of grades and more! CHAPTER 1 THE FEDERALIST ERA The results of the first elections held

York proposed an amendment to the bill which would prohibit slavery in Missouri. The Southern outcry was immediate, and the ensuing debate grew hot. The Senate was dead-locked. 3.3.1 Henry Clay’s Compromise Solution As the debate dragged on, the northern territory of Massachusetts applied for admission as the state of Maine. This offered a way out of the dilemma, and House Speaker Clay formulated a package that both sides could accept. The two admission bills were combined, with Maine coming

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