Who Was Annie Oakley?

Who Was Annie Oakley?

Stephanie Spinner

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 0448424975

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


You want girl power? Meet Annie Oakley! Born in 1860, she became one of the best-loved and most famous women of her generation. She amazed audiences all over the world with her sharpshooting, horse-riding, action-packed performances. In an age when most women stayed home, she traveled the world and forged a new image for American women.

Surfing in San Diego (Images of America)

A Zombie's History of the United States: From the Massacre at Plymouth Rock to the CIA's Secret War on the Undead

Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water (Revised Edition)

Location Filming in Los Angeles (Images of America)

Sex and the Founding Fathers: The American Quest for a Relatable Past (Sexuality Studies)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

table in the arena, she gave the signal and Frank started releasing targets. Clay birds flew into the air, first singly, then in pairs, then in threes and fours. As fast as they came, Annie hit them all. Then she shot glass balls, sometimes fifty or sixty in a row. If she missed, she scowled and stamped her foot. Then she would quickly do a much harder stunt—perhaps lying on her back across a chair and shooting a target upside down—just to show the audience that she had missed on purpose.

table in the arena, she gave the signal and Frank started releasing targets. Clay birds flew into the air, first singly, then in pairs, then in threes and fours. As fast as they came, Annie hit them all. Then she shot glass balls, sometimes fifty or sixty in a row. If she missed, she scowled and stamped her foot. Then she would quickly do a much harder stunt—perhaps lying on her back across a chair and shooting a target upside down—just to show the audience that she had missed on purpose.

with the princess, and this was her way of showing it. Edward took no offense. “What a pity there are not more women in the world like that little one,” he remarked. Soon after he wrote to Bill. Would “Annie Oakley, the little girl who shoots so cleverly in your show,” agree to a shooting match against Grand Duke Michael of Russia? Annie must have been pleased that Edward had singled her out rather than Lillian Smith. She accepted and beat the duke. Her next royal encounter pleased Annie

Annie Oakley. It was sixty-four pages of whopping lies and wild stories, and the public loved it. Annie also established herself as a world-class markswoman in London. The Notting Hill Gun Club, a group of the best shots in England, presented her with a large gold medal—the only one it ever awarded. The London gunmaker Charles Lancaster admired Annie’s shooting so much that he designed and made a group of light-weight guns just for her. By now, Annie far outshone Lillian Smith, though Lillian

splendid, and Annie’s performances were wonderful. But Bill’s hopes were dashed. The country was suffering a depression, and many people couldn’t afford show tickets. Attendance was so poor that the show was in debt by the end of the season. The only solution, announced Bill, was to go on the road again. For the next five years, Annie and Frank saw little of their dream house in New Jersey. They spent most of their time traveling with the show, which now was managed by James Bailey of circus

Download sample

Download